Peer Gynt, bad boy of Norway

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St. Olaf professor Todd Nichol says Peer Gynt is only one side of the Norwegian character. “He is a bookend to another great figure created by Ibsen, Brand,” Nichol explains. “Brand is a highly idealistic, enormously willful Lutheran pastor and Peer Gynt is a feckless opportunist.”